CSU Health Information Management Health Insurance Discussion

After reading the background materials as well as additional information you find from the literature and online sources, respond to the following questions for this module’s SLP:

  1. Discuss the sources of health insurance coverage in your home state, or any state of your choosing, for the following groups:
    • Seniors age 65 and older
    • Children younger than 18
    • Low-income families with at least one child, whose family income is below 133% of the Federal Poverty Level
    • The self-employed
    • Employees of large companies (more than 100 employees)
    • Employees of small businesses
    • Part-time, temporary, and seasonal employees
    • The unemployed
    • College students
  2. Discuss whether the groups listed above need to contribute to the premiums of their health insurance.

SLP Assignment Expectations

Length: Write a 3- to 5-page paper, typed and double spaced, with 12 pt. Times New Roman font and 1-inch page margins. Use headers throughout the paper. This will aid you in not overlooking vital elements of the assignment and make the document easier for the reader to follow.


Required Reading

Baicker K, & Chandra A. (2008). Myths and Misconceptions about U.S. Health Insurance. Health Affairs, 27(6), w533-43. Retrieved from ProQuest on 11/21/2012.

Blumenthal D. (2006). Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance in the United States – Origins and Implications. New England Medical Journal, 355(1), 82-88. Retrieved from ProQuest on 11/21/2012.

Bodenheimer, T. (2005). High and Rising Health Care Costs. Part 1:
Seeking an Explanation. Annals of Internal Medicine, 142 (10), 847-854. Available at:

Choudhry, N., Rosenthal, M. & Milstein, A. (2010). Assessing the Evidence for Value-Based Insurance Design. Health Affairs, 29 (11), 1988-1994. Retrieved from ProQuest on 11/21/2012.

Claxton, G. (2008). How Private Health Care Coverage Works: A Primer. A Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Report. Available at (Retrieved 11/21/2012)

Eibner, C., Hussey, P., & Girosi, F. (2010) The Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Workers’ Health Insurance Coverage. New England Journal of Medicine, 363 (15), 1393-1395. Available at Trident University Online Library.

U.S. Census. (2018). Health insurance coverage in the United States: 2017. Retrieved from

Required Website

Kaiser Family Foundation (2009). Health Insurance and Access to Health Care: the Evidence. Available at:

Expert Solution Preview

Introduction:

The sources of health insurance coverage vary from state to state in the United States. In this assignment, we will discuss the sources of health insurance coverage in a specific home state for different groups of individuals. We will also examine whether these groups need to contribute to the premiums of their health insurance.

Answer:

1. Sources of health insurance coverage in the home state:

– Seniors age 65 and older:
– Medicare is the primary source of health insurance for seniors age 65 and older. It is a federal health insurance program that provides coverage for hospital services (Part A) and medical services (Part B). Seniors can choose to enroll in private Medicare Advantage plans (Part C) or Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) for additional benefits.

– Children younger than 18:
– In our home state, children younger than 18 are primarily covered by the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). This program provides affordable health coverage to low-income families that do not qualify for Medicaid.

– Low-income families with at least one child, whose family income is below 133% of the Federal Poverty Level:
– For low-income families, Medicaid is the main source of health insurance coverage. Medicaid is a joint federal and state program that provides health coverage to eligible individuals and families with low income.

– The self-employed:
– The self-employed individuals in our home state can obtain health insurance coverage through the individual market. They can purchase health insurance plans directly from insurance companies or use the Health Insurance Marketplace established under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

– Employees of large companies (more than 100 employees):
– Employees of large companies often receive health insurance coverage through their employers. These companies typically offer group health insurance plans to their employees, which provide comprehensive benefits.

– Employees of small businesses:
– In our home state, small businesses have the option to offer health insurance coverage to their employees. Some small businesses may purchase group health insurance plans, while others may participate in Small Business Health Options Programs (SHOP) offered through the Health Insurance Marketplace.

– Part-time, temporary, and seasonal employees:
– Part-time, temporary, and seasonal employees may have limited options for health insurance coverage. They can explore individual plans in the private market or consider short-term health insurance plans. Additionally, they may be eligible for government programs such as Medicaid or CHIP if they meet the income requirements.

– The unemployed:
– The unemployed individuals in our home state may have various options for health insurance coverage. They can apply for Medicaid if they meet the income requirements. Additionally, they may be eligible for subsidized health insurance plans through the Health Insurance Marketplace based on their income level.

– College students:
– College students in our home state have several sources of health insurance coverage. They may be covered under their parents’ health insurance plans until the age of 26. Alternatively, they can purchase individual health insurance plans or utilize the health services provided by their college or university.

2. Contribution to health insurance premiums:

– Seniors age 65 and older:
– Seniors age 65 and older need to pay premiums for Medicare Part B coverage. The premium amount is typically deducted from their Social Security benefits. They may also need to pay premiums for Medicare Advantage plans or Medicare prescription drug coverage, depending on the plan they choose.

– Children younger than 18:
– Children covered by CHIP generally do not have to contribute to the premiums of their health insurance. However, some states may require nominal fees or cost-sharing for certain services.

– Low-income families with at least one child, whose family income is below 133% of the Federal Poverty Level:
– Medicaid coverage for low-income families is usually free or offered at a low cost. The exact contribution, if any, depends on the specific state’s Medicaid program.

– The self-employed:
– The self-employed individuals pay the full premiums for their health insurance coverage. They do not have an employer to share the costs, so they are responsible for the entire premium amount.

– Employees of large companies (more than 100 employees):
– Employees of large companies typically share the cost of health insurance premiums with their employers. The exact contribution amount varies depending on the company’s benefits package.

– Employees of small businesses:
– Employees of small businesses may also share the cost of health insurance premiums with their employers. The contribution amount depends on the specific small business health insurance plan.

– Part-time, temporary, and seasonal employees:
– Part-time, temporary, and seasonal employees may or may not have access to employer-sponsored health insurance plans. If they do have access, they may need to contribute to the premiums based on the terms of the plan. Otherwise, they can explore individual plans in the private market.

– The unemployed:
– The unemployed individuals may be eligible for subsidized health insurance plans through the Health Insurance Marketplace. The premium amount they need to contribute is based on their income level. Additionally, some state Medicaid programs may require small premiums or cost-sharing for certain populations.

– College students:
– College students who are covered under their parents’ health insurance plans generally do not have to contribute to the premiums. However, if they purchase individual health insurance plans, they will need to pay the premiums themselves.

In conclusion, the sources of health insurance coverage and the need for individuals to contribute to premiums vary depending on the group and the specific state’s healthcare policies and programs.

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